Apple Valley Animal Hospital

1207 cedar creek grade Winchester, Va 22602
winchester, VA 22602

(540)667-0260

www.applevalleypet.com

Parasite Information

Coccidia

Clinical Signs:

  • Upset stomach. Could cause vomiting.
  • Weight loss.
  • Diarrhea – watery, could have mucus or blood.
  • Stress can bring it out.
  • Coccidia are not visible to the naked eye.

Where does it come from?

  • Ingesting the coccidia.
  • Contaminated dirt or grass that pet comes in contact with.

Testing:

  • Fecal sample ran in the veterinary hospital

Treatment:

  • Deworming and retesting a fecal sample in 3 – 4 weeks.
  • Antidiarrheal medication may be given.
  • Remove poop from the yard.

Zoonotic Potential:

  • Yes, humans can catch this by ingesting contaminated poop
  • Practice good hygiene! Wash your hands after handling poop or playing with pet.
  • Contact a human physician if you or your family become infected

Giardia

Clinical signs:

  • Weight loss
  • May become watery and contain mucus.
  • Gassy
  • Vomiting is a possibility.
  • Giardia are not visible to the naked eye.

Where do they come from?

  • Drinking contaminated water.
  • Ingesting contaminated poop.

Testing:

  • Fecal sample ran at the veterinary hospital

Treatment:

  • Deworming and retesting another poop sample in 3 – 4 weeks.
  • Antidiarrheal medication may be given.
  • Wash pets bedding in hot water.
  • Clean up any poop from yard.
  • Wash pet bedding in hot water.

Zoonotic Potential:

  • Yes, humans can catch this by ingesting contaminated poop or contaminated water.
  • Practice good hygiene! Wash your hands after handling poop or playing with pet.
  • Grassy areas can be contaminated for at least 1 month.
  • Contact a human physician if you or your family become infected

Hookworm

Clinical signs:

  • Hookworms attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood. Causing pale gums.
  • Watery diarrhea or black and tarry.
  • Distended abdomen and a poor coat quality.
  • Not hungry.
  • Hookworms are not visible to the naked eye.

Where do they come from?

  • From mother to puppy/kitten in the womb or when nursing.
  • Ingesting the hookworm.
  • They can penetrate the skin.

Testing:

  • Fecal sample ran at the veterinary hospital.

Treatment:

  • Deworming and retesting another poop sample in 3 – 4 weeks.
  • Clean up all fecal matter out of the yard.
  • Monthly oral heartworm prevention also deworms at the same time.
  • Wash pet bedding in hot water.

Zoonotic Potential:

  • Yes, humans can catch this by ingesting contaminated poop.
  • Practice good hygiene! Wash your hands after handling poop or playing with pet.
  • Hookworms can penetrate skin, so wear shoes when around an infected pet or yard.
  • They like sandy beaches and moist soil.
  • Can cause cutaneous larva migrans or “creeping eruption”.
Contact a human physician if you or your family become infected.

Roundworm

Clinical Signs:

  • Diarrhea, vomiting, enlarged abdomen in puppies and kittens.
  • Diarrhea in adult dogs and cats.
  • Roundworms look like “cooked spaghetti noodles” in poop.
  • Visually seeing worms in the poop.

Where do they come from?

  • From mother to puppy/kitten in the womb or when nursing.
  • By ingesting the roundworm egg.
  • By sniffing the ground and inhaling eggs.

Testing:

  • Fecal sample ran in the veterinary hospital.

Treatment:

  • Deworming and then retesting a fecal sample in 3 to 4 weeks.
  • Clean up all poop out of the yard. Do not let your pet eat poop.
  • Monthly oral heartworm prevention also deworms at the same time.
  • Wash pet bedding in hot water.

Zoonotic Potential:

  • Yes, humans can catch this by ingesting contaminated poop.
  • Practice good hygiene! Wash your hands after handling poop or playing with pet.
  • Sandboxes can become litterboxes. Use with caution.
  • Contact a human physician if you or your family become infected.

Tapeworm

Clinical signs:

  • Tapeworm segments can be seen on poop. Looks like “rice”.
  • Pets may scoot their rear end on the ground.
  • Segments maybe found around the tail area of the pet.
  • Dried segments can also be found on bedding material.

Where do they come from?

  • From fleas. Fleas become infected when they ingest the tapeworm embryo. This is why flea prevention is so important.

Testing:

  • A fecal sample ran in the veterinary hospital.
  • Visually seeing the segments on the tail area of the pet.

Treatment:

  • Deworming and then retesting another poop sample in 3 – 4 weeks.
  • Treat all pets and the house for fleas.
  • Vacuum all floors, curtains and couches. Throw the vacuum bag out. Fleas can crawl out of vacuums.
  • Wash all pet bedding in hot water.
  • Clean up all poop out of the yard.
  • Interceptor the monthly oral heartworm prevention deworms at the same time.

Zoonotic Potential:

  • Yes, humans can catch this by ingesting a flea infected with a tapeworm.
  • Practice good hygiene! Wash your hands after cleaning up after or playing with your pet. Contact a human physician if you or your family become infected.

Whipworms

 

Clinical Signs:

  • Whipworms attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood.
  • Weight loss.
  • Poor coat quality.
  • Poop may contain blood.
  • Whipworms are not visible to the naked eye.

Where do they come from?

  • By ingesting the whipworm egg.
  • They can live in the environment for years. Hard to get rid of.
  • By sniffing the ground and inhaling eggs.

Testing:

  • Fecal sample ran in the veterinary hospital.

Treatment:

  • Deworming and retesting another poop sample in 3 – 4 weeks.
  • Monthly oral Heartworm prevention also deworms at the same time.
  • Clean up poop out of the yard.
  • Wash pet bedding in hot water or replace it. Eggs are hardy and impossible to destroy.

Zoonotic Potential:

  • Yes, humans can catch this by ingesting contaminated poop
  • Whipworm eggs are hardy and hard to get rid of.
  • Practice good hygiene! Wash your hands after handling poop or playing with pet.
  • Contact a human physician if you or your family become infected.